Catherine Booth


Catherine Booth, née Catherine Mumford, (born Jan. 17, 1829, Ashbourne, Derbyshire, Eng.—died Oct. 4, 1890, Clacton, Essex), wife of the founder of the Salvation Army (William Booth), and herself an eloquent preacher and social worker.

Her father was a carriage builder and sometime Methodist lay preacher, her mother a deeply religious woman of Puritan type. Catherine, in adolescence an invalid, was educated principally at home, and early acquired some competence in the theology of her day. The family moved to London in 1844, and she became an active member of the Wesleyan Methodist Church in Brixton. When this church expelled a group of “reformers,” she and her future husband joined them. They were married in 1855, and Catherine became her husband’s devoted helper.

Catherine Booth was a convinced believer in women’s right to preach the gospel, and her pamphlet Female Ministry (1859) is still cogent. She herself began to preach in her husband’s church at Gateshead in 1860. She became a notable orator and in 1880–84 conducted highly successful meetings in various halls in the West End of London. In 1885 she took part in a campaign that secured the passing of the Criminal Law Amendment Act, designed to protect young girls.

She did not believe that the sacraments are essential to salvation. Although the evolution of the sacramental attitude of the Salvation Army must not be wholly attributed to Catherine Booth, her beliefs were undoubtedly influential.

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